Magnum IPA (7.7% ABV)

magnum

The third in our trio of Imperial IPA variations, the Magnum IPA is so named because it uses the extremely bitter hop variety Magnum. There is a medium amount of maltiness, with a moderate body, in stark contrast to the other two. The hops are extremely bitter, with less aroma and flavor than the Double Hop or Mega IPA, but with a bit more overall bitterness. The finish is less hop-oriented than the other two, with residual sweetness and little hop finish.

Smoked Porter (5.2% ABV)

smokedporterThe porter is an old style that originated over three centuries ago in England. A smoked flavor interacts nicely with the sweetness. This is a moderately bitter beer, although the bitterness is undermined by the low hop aroma and flavor. The overall impression is of a traditional English porter, moderately dark, with roasted flavorings, and a little maltiness thrown in.

A great beer for black and tans.

Mega Hop IPA (7.0%)

mhThis hybrid is a cross between our Double Hop IPA and a big American IPA. There is a moderate body, which interacts interestingly with the hops. The very bitter American hops used are quite different from the fragrant hops of the Double Hop, with the result being a bitterer beer with a little more flavor and a quite different aroma. The overall impression is of a big American IPA, brewed with bitter hops, in a quite different take on the style than our Double Hop IPA.

Double Hop IPA (7.0% ABV)

2xhThe Imperial IPA is a very new style, created by taking a regular IPA and amping it up a bit. It is a little lighter in color than a regular IPA, with a nice, vigorous golden hue. There is very little maltiness in this beer, although it has a moderate body. The hops are the stalwart backbone of the style. There is an incredible amount of hop flavor and bitterness, and a definite interplay of varieties and locales in the different types of hops. The dry finish is typical of an IPA, and the result is a big beer, with only a hint of maltiness and a lot of hop character.

ESB (4.9% ABV)

esbAn old English style, the ESB was the bitterest beer around during its heyday. It is colored gold, with a moderate maltiness and a medium body. The hop flavor is distinctly British, with a medium hop aroma and medium bitterness, and it interplays nicely with the body and the light, delicate carbonation. With its middle-of-the-road finish and its moderate strength, this is the perfect session beer. The overall impression is of a golden, moderately malty ale with medium hop flavor and bitterness. Expect to see it whenever the QCers’ begging and pleading finally gets to me.